Enoch’s Piety and Translation

Eternal God, our wondering souls
Admire Thy matchless grace;
That Thou wilt walk, that thou wilt dwell,
With Adam’s worthless race.

O lead me to that happy path,
Where I my God may meet;
Tho’ hosts of foes begird it round,
Tho’ briars wound my feet.

Cheer’d with Thy converse, I can trace
The desert with delight
Thro’ all the gloom one smile of Thine
Can dissipate the night.

Nor shall I thro’ eternal days
A restless pilgrim roam;
Thy hand, that now directs my course,
Shall soon convey me home.

I ask not Enoch’s rapt’rous flight
To realms of heav’nly day;
Nor seek Elijah’s fiery steeds
To bear this flesh away.

Joyful my spirit will content
To drop its mortal load;
And hail the sharpest pangs of death,
That break its ways to God.
Enoch’s Piety and Translation (Genesis 5:24; Hebrews 11:5)

-Philip Doddridge, Published 1755. Republished in The Hymns of Philip Doddridge, compiled by Graham C. Ashworth. Reformation Heritage Books, 2010. (hymn 1)

Rejoicing in Our Covenant Engagements to God

O happy day, that fixed my choice
On Thee, my Savior and my God!
Well may this glowing heart rejoice,
And tell its raptures all abroad.

O happy bond, that seals my vows
To Him Who merits all my love!
Let cheerful anthems fill His house,
While to that sacred shrine I move.

’Tis done: the great transaction’s done!
I am the Lord’s and He is mine;
He drew me, and I followed on;
Charmed to confess the voice divine.

Now rest, my long divided heart,
Fixed on this blissful center, rest.
Here have I found a nobler part;
Here heavenly pleasures fill my breast.

High heaven, that heard the solemn vow,
That vow renewed shall daily hear,
Till in life’s latest hour I bow
And bless in death a bond so dear.

-Philip Doddridge, Published 1755.  Republished in The Hymns of Philip Doddridge, compiled by Graham C. Ashworth. Reformation Heritage Books, 2010. (hymn 23)

Do Not I Love Thee

Do not I love Thee, O my Lord?
Behold my heart and see;
And turn each cursed idol out,
That dares to rival Thee.

Do not I love Thee, O my Lord?
Then let me nothing love;
Dead be my heart to every joy,
When Jesus cannot move.

Is not Thy Name melodious still
To mine attentive ear?
Doth not each pulse with pleasure bound
My Savior’s voice to hear?

Hast Thou a lamb in all Thy flock
I would disdain to feed?
Hast Thou a foe, before whose face
I fear Thy cause to plead?

Would not mine ardent spirit vie
With angels round the throne,
To execute Thy sacred will,
And make Thy glory known?

Would not my heart pour forth its blood
In honor of Thy Name?
And challenge the cold hand of death
To damp th’immortal flame?

Thou know’st I love Thee, dearest Lord,
But O, I long to soar
Far from the sphere of mortal joys,
And learn to love Thee more!

 

-Philip Doddridge, Published 1755.  Republished in The Hymns of Philip Doddridge, compiled by Graham C. Ashworth. Reformation Heritage Books, 2010.

And Will the Judge Descend

And will the Judge descend,
And must the dead arise
And not a single soul escape
His all discerning eyes?

And from His righteous lips
Shall this dread sentence sound
And through the numerous guilty throng
Spread black despair around:

“Depart from Me, accursed,
To everlasting flame,
For rebel angels first prepared,
Where mercy never came”?

How will my heart endure
The terrors of that day
When earth and Heav’n before His face
Astonished shrink away?

But ere that trumpet shakes
The mansions of the dead,
Hark from the Gospel’s cheering sound
What joyful tidings spread:

Ye sinners, seek His grace
Whose wrath ye cannot bear;
Fly to the shelter of His cross
And find salvation there.

-Philip Doddridge, pub­lished post­hu­mous­ly in Hymns Founde­d on Var­i­ous Texts in the Ho­ly Scrip­ture. By the Late Rev­er­end Phil­ip Dod­dridge, D. D., by Job Or­ton (J. Ed­dowes & J. Cot­ton: 1755).