Revelation by Seance

“The proliferation of astrologers, seers, mediums, and other later-day ‘prophets’ is one direct result of widespread dissatisfaction with present circumstances and the wistful desire of millions throughout the world to know the future. Feeling that ‘science’ and ‘humanism’ have failed, people shift their faith to pseudoscience and superhumanism, still desperately searching for meaningful answers for their future….

Even many Christians are overly impressed by such seers, attributing their psychic abilities to demonic powers. If they are really supernaturally guided, however, even by demons, one would think their predictions would have a better percentage of success.

The fact is that neither angels nor demons are omniscient and therefore they can know little more about the future than human beings. It is true that men and women can—through planning and working—influence the future to some degree. Also, through analyses and reasoning they could to some extent predict the future. By virtue of their greater powers and greater knowledge, plus their ability to share such knowledge and abilities with other invisible spirits, it is no doubt true that angels and demons can both foresee and influence the future more that could human beings.

But only God is omnipotent, omnipresent, and  omniscient. Since He created time, He stands outside time and thus knows and controls all events everywhere through all time. He may, on occasion choose to share some of His knowledge with His holy angels, or with chosen men. To this extent—and only this extent—can we really know the future, which brings us to the purpose of the Book of Revelation.

This capstone on the wonderful structure of the written Word of God was written specifically to provide knowledge of the future. This is made clear in the very first verse:

‘The Revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave unto him, to show unto His slaves things which must shortly come to pass; and He sent and signified it by His messenger unto His slave John (Revelation 1:1).'”

-Henry M. Morris, The Revelation Record,Wheaton,IL: Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., 1983, 18-19

Does the Book of Genesis Really Matter?

The Book of Genesis is probably the most important book ever written. The Bible as a whole would surely be considered (even by those who don’t believe in its inspiration) as the book that has exerted the greatest influence on history of any book ever produced. The Bible, however, is actually a compilation of many books, and the Book of Genesis is the foundation of all of them.

If the Bible were somehow expurgated of the Book of Genesis (as many people today would prefer), the rest of the Bible would be incomprehensible. It would be like a building without a ground floor, or a bridge with no support.

The books of the Old Testament, narrating God’s dealings with the people of Israel, would be provincial and bigoted, were they not set in the context of God’s developing purposes for all mankind, as laid down in the early chapters of Genesis.

The New Testament, describing the execution and implementation of God’s plan for man’s redemption, is redundant and anachronistic, except in the light of man’s desperate need for salvation, as established in the record of man’s primeval history, recorded in Genesis.

The Book of Genesis gives vital information concerning the origin of all things-and therefore the meaning of all things-which would otherwise be forever inaccessible to man. The future is bound up in the past. One’s belief concerning his origin will inevitably determine his belief concerning his purpose and his destiny. A naturalistic, animalistic concept of the beginnings specifies a naturalistic, animalistic program for the future.

An origin at the hands of an omnipotent, holy, loving God, on the other hand, necessarily predicts a divine purpose in history and an assurance of the consummation of that purpose. A believing understanding of the Book of Genesis is therefore prerequisite to an understanding of God and His meaning to man.”

-Henry M. Morris, The Genesis Record: A Scientific and Devotional Commentary on the Book of Beginnings, 1976, 17-18