Come Lonely Heart

Come, lonely heart, to the outsider’s Friend—
To Jesus, Who seeks out the lost.
Your cruel seclusion has come to an end;
Find welcome, find home, at the cross.
No soul is too small for His mercy;
No sin is too great for His grace!
Come, lonely heart, to the outsider’s Friend;
Find welcome, find home, at the Cross.

Drink, thirsty heart, of the water of life—
Of bountiful, soul-quenching grace.
The world’s broken cisterns cannot satisfy;
The Savior is what your heart craves.
No soul is too small for His mercy;
No sin is too great for His grace!
Drink, thirsty heart, of the water of life;
The Savior is what your heart craves.

Rest, guilty heart, in forgiveness of sin—
In pardon from shame-stirring vice.
Though Satan and sinners and conscience condemn,
Your soul may be spotless as Christ.
No soul is too small for His mercy;
No sin is too great for His grace!
Rest, guilty heart, in forgiveness of sin;
Your soul may be spotless as Christ.

Joy, grateful heart, in the hope you have found—
In God, Who is seeking your praise.
Then go to the outcast, that grace may resound,
For Jesus is mighty to save.
No soul is too small for His mercy;
No sin is too great for His grace!
Joy, grateful heart, in the hope you have found,
For Jesus is mighty to save.

(Text by Chris Anderson; Tune by Greg Habegger)
Copyright 2012 ChurchWorksMedia.com. All rights reserved.

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DOCTRINAL NOTES

Because God delights in worship that is biblical, thoughtful and passionate—what we often call intentional—please consider the following overview of the biblical texts and doctrinal themes behind the hymn Come, Lonely Heart:

This hymn text is based on John’s account of Jesus’ meeting with the Samaritan woman at the well in Sychar (John 4:1–42).

The first verse calls the lonely heart to come to Jesus, the outsider’s Friend. Remember the surprise of the Samaritan woman that Jesus, a Jewish man, would speak to her, a Samaritan woman (John 4:9). Furthermore, this woman was ostracized even by her own community because of her checkered past (John 4:18). But Jesus lovingly spoke to her and told her about the water of life (John 4:10, 13–14). No soul is too small or too unimportant for Jesus’ mercy and no sin is beyond the pale of his grace. Sinners can find welcome at the cross, where sin is forgiven.

The second verse urges the thirsty heart to drink deeply of the water of life. Jesus offered this “living water” to the Samaritan woman, but unlike running water that did not need to be drawn out of a well, he spoke of himself, who alone satisfies every desire of the human heart. While human beings constantly dig leaky cisterns (cf. Jer 2:13) in a futile attempt to satisfy the emptiness of their souls, Jesus Christ is what the thirsty heart is craving.

The third verse soothes the guilty heart, pointing to the relief of forgiven sin. For the Samaritan woman, a self-described sinner, Jesus offered forgiveness and rest from her sinfulness. In fact, rather than condemning us, Jesus gave his life as a propitiating sacrifice (Rom 8:34) and then stands as our Advocate before God the Father (1 John 2:1). He pleads his blood against Satan who accuses God’s children (cf. Zech 3:1; Rev 12:10). His sacrificial death provides an answer to the rightful charges of sinners and even our own consciences (1 John 3:20). Through Jesus Christ’s death and life, we stand before God in perfect righteousness (Rom 4:24–25).

The fourth verse encourages the grateful heart to rejoice in the hope of knowing Christ. This hope cannot be silent, but must share itself with others just like the Samaritan woman did, abandoning her water jug, returning to her town, and telling her neighbors, “Come, see a man who told me all that I ever did. Can this be the Christ?” (John 4:29). This grace resounds as former enemies of God, brought near by the blood of Christ, go to other enemies of God and plead with them to be reconciled to God (Eph 2:13; 2 Cor 5:18–21). The grateful heart acknowledges God’s grace in salvation, and if God will show mercy to the “chief of sinners,” surely Jesus is mighty to save all who come to him in faith (1 Tim 1:15). “Everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved” (Rom 10:13). “For there is no distinction: for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, and are justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus” (Rom 3:22b–24).

(The notes for Come, Lonely Heart were written by Mark Perry. Many thanks, Mark.)

Copyright 2014 ChurchWorksMedia.com. All rights reserved.

Holy, Mighty, Worthy

Holy, holy, holy!” Seraph choirs extol Thee.
Bending wings, they humbly sing, of Thy lofty majesty!
Thou alone art holy! Who on earth is like Thee?
Grant that we, like Thee may be holy, holy, holy.

“Mighty, mighty, mighty!” Sun and stars declare Thee.
All creation joins to sing of Thy pow’r and deity!
Thou alone art mighty! Naught was made without Thee!
Grant that we Thy pow’r may see. Mighty, mighty, mighty.

“Worthy, worthy, worthy!” Saints in heav’n exalt Thee.
Lamb, once slain, now raised to reign: Savior, Judge and conq-ring King!
Thou alone art worthy! All was made to please Thee.
Grant that we in heav’n may sing, “Worthy, worthy, worthy!”

“Glory, glory, glory!” We, Thy church, adore Thee.
Called by grace to bring Thee praise; trophies of Thy pow’r to save!
None shall share Thy glory! All shall bow before Thee.
Father, Son and Spirit: One! “Glory, glory, glory!”

(Text by Chris Anderson; Tune by Greg Habegger)
Copyright 2006 ChurchWorksMedia.com. All rights reserved.

Come Quickly, Lord!

Creation groans beneath the curse—
Rebellion’s just reward.
We long to see the fall reversed
And Eden’s joys restored.

Refrain:
Come quickly, Lord! Make all things new!
Redeem the church, Your bride.
With longing eyes we look for You,
for home is at Your side!

So weary of our trait’rous flesh—
Of sin we hate, yet crave—
We yearn to see temptation’s death,
Indwelling sin’s dark grave.

We want to hear the joyous cries
And join the ransomed throng:
“The Lamb is worthy!” praise will rise
From ev’ry tribe and tongue!

We joy to fix our gaze on Christ,
Though now our view is dim.
We long for heaven’s grandest prize:
To see and be like Him!

(Text by Chris Anderson; Tune by Greg Habegger)
Copyright 2008 ChurchWorksMedia.com. All rights reserved.

My Jesus Fair

My Jesus, fair, was pierced by thorns,
By thorns grown from the fall.
Thus He who gave the curse was torn
To end that curse for all.

Chorus:
O love divine, O matchless grace-
That God should die for men!
With joyful grief I lift my praise,
Abhorring all my sin,
Adoring only Him.

My Jesus, meek, was scorned by men,
By men in blasphemy.
“Father, forgive their senseless sin!”
He prayed, for them, for me.

My Jesus, kind, was torn by nails,
By nails of cruel men.
And to His cross, as grace prevailed,
God pinned my wretched sin.

My Jesus, pure, was crushed by God,
By God, in judgment just.
The Father grieved, yet turned His rod
On Christ, made sin for us.

My Jesus, strong, shall come to reign,
To reign in majesty.
The Lamb arose, and death is slain.
Lord, come in victory!

(Text by Chris Anderson; Tune by Greg Habegger)
Copyright 2008 ChurchWorksMedia.com. All rights reserved.

I Run to Christ

I run to Christ when chased by fear
And find a refuge sure.
“Believe in me,” His voice I hear;
His words and wounds secure.

I run to Christ when torn by grief
And find abundant peace.
“I too had tears,” He gently speaks;
Thus joy and sorrow meet.

I run to Christ when worn by life
And find my soul refreshed.
“Come unto Me,” He calls through strife;
Fatigue gives way to rest.

I run to Christ when vexed by hell
And find a mighty arm.
“The Devil flees,” the Scriptures tell;
He roars, but cannot harm.

I run to Christ when stalked by sin
And find a sure escape.
“Deliver me,” I cry to Him;
Temptation yields to grace.

I run to Christ when plagued by shame
And find my one defense.
“I bore God’s wrath,” He pleads my case—
My Advocate and Friend.

(Text by Chris Anderson; Tune by Greg Habegger)
Copyright 2010 ChurchWorksMedia.com. All rights reserved.

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I RUN TO CHRIST DOCTRINAL NOTES (by Chris Anderson)

Because God delights in worship that is biblical, thoughtful and passionate—what we often call intentional—please consider the following overview of the biblical texts and doctrinal themes behind the hymn I Run to Christ:

The Scriptures consistently point God’s people to Christ as the solution to all problems. Our Lord answers our greatest need by providing forgiveness and freedom from sin. But He helps with lesser needs, as well. He gives hope, comfort and rest to us when we are dealing with the multifaceted consequences of sin. He gives hope to the bereaved husband, joy to the depressed student, and strength to the weary mother as surely as He gives grace to the penitent sinner. Until Christ outlaws suffering at His return, He sustains us through it when we run to Him.

Verse 1a gives hope to the fearful. God is a refuge in trouble (Psalm 46, et al). He commands us not to let our hearts be troubled, but instead to believe in Him (John 14:1). His promises—and even more so His death in our place—provide courage and comfort in trials (cf Rom 8:32).

Verse 1b gives hope to the sorrowful. Christ provides peace that exceeds our understanding (Phil 4:7; John 14:27). In particular, we are encouraged to know that He can sympathize with each of our weaknesses since He shared them (Heb 4:14-15), including sorrow (John 11:35). More than encouragement, we find grace as we boldly seek God through Christ (Heb 4:16). Our Lord doesn’t end our sorrows, but He gives us joy in the midst of sadness (John 16:33).

Verse 2a gives hope to the weary. At times, our greatest burden isn’t a tragedy; it’s just life and its many challenges. Christ invites those who are weary and heavy laden to find rest in Him (Matthew 11:28).

Verse 2b gives hope to the oppressed. Satan’s hateful temptation and accusation of believers is a trial indeed (1 Pet 5:8; Rev 12:10). Yet, Scripture teaches that the Savior who indwells us is greater than the Devil (1 John 4:4). Satan is on a short leash; Christ’s authority over him is unquestioned (Luke 10:18), and His victory over him at Calvary is absolute (Heb 2;14). Because we are united to Christ, Satan must flee when we resist Him (James 4:7; 1 Peter 5:9).

Verse 3a gives hope to the tempted. Because of Christ, we are no longer enslaved to sin (Rom 6). He faithfully provides us with a way of escape when tempted (1 Cor 10:13). Obedience is possible when we seek deliverance through Christ (Mat 6:13). He offers freedom, not only forgiveness.

Verse 3b gives hope to the ashamed. Though God enables and commands our obedience (1 John 2:1), He has graciously provided for our failures, as well (1 John 2:2). Our defense when accused of sin—even when justly so—is Jesus Christ, not our own sorrow, confession, or determination to do better. Jesus has suffered for sin as our propitiation, and He represents us before the Heavenly Father as our Advocate.

Whatever your need, run to Christ and find infinite help.

Copyright 2010 ChurchWorksMedia.com. All rights reserved.