Edwards: That the Glory of God’s Holiness May Be Consistent with His Grace

“The very end of Christ’s dying for sin, was that the glory of God’s jealousy, holiness and justice might be consistent with this grace; that while God thus manifested his mercy, we might not conceive any unworthy thoughts of God with respect to his majesty and authority and justice, as we should be in danger to do if grace was offered absolutely: we should not know what a great evil sin was, and how dreadful a thing it is to offend an infinite majesty, and how holy and jealous God is. Seeing therefore that this is the end of Christ’s coming, that we might be sensible of this, though we are saved and all sin forgiven; it seems therefore necessary that we should be made sensible of it, in order to our being brought into a state of salvation.”

-Jonathan Edwards, The Miscellanies, as recorded by Owen Strachan, Always in God’s Hands: Day by Day in the Company of Jonathan Edwards, 320.

Edwards: Justice Demands Adoption

“The redemption by Christ is particularly wonderful upon this acount, inasmuch as the justice of God is not only appeased to those who have an interest in him, but stands up for them; is not only not an enemy but a friend, every whit as much as mercy. Justice demands adoption and glorification, and importunes as much for it, as ever it did before for misery; in every respect
that it is against the wicked, it is as much for the godly.”

-Jonathan Edwards, Miscellanies, as recorded by Owen Strachan, Always in God’s Hands: Day by Day in the Company of Jonathan Edwards, 303.

Edwards: Rejoicing in Divine Beauty

“Christ and his church rejoice in each other’s beauty. The church rejoices in Christ’s divine beauty and glory. She as it were sweetly solaces herself in the light of the glory of the Sun of Righteousness; and the saints say one to another, as in Isaiah 2:5, “O house of Jacob, come ye, let us walk in the light of the Lord.”… And Christ delights and rejoices in the beauty of the church, the beauty which he hath put upon her: her Christian graces are “ornaments of great price in his sight” (1 Peter 3:4). And he is spoken of as “greatly desiring her beauty” (Psalms 45:11).”

-Jonathan Edwards, Sermons and Discourses, 1743-1758, as recorded by Owen Strachan, Always in God’s Hands: Day by Day in the Company of Jonathan Edwards, 300.

Edwards: Human Affections

“We are the higbest affected with the lowest excellencies; we have the easiest and greatest delight in things that in themselves are least delightful; things that are less beautiful and amiable in themselves, strike much quicker and deeper in with the sense and propension and constitution of the mind than things that have in themselves the highest excellence, most charming beauty and exquisite sweetness.

Yea, we can hardly bring ourselves to be in any measure pleased with the beauty, or to taste any sweetness at all, in things that are infinitely the greatest excellencies.”

-Jonathan Edwards, The Miscellanies, as recorded by Owen Strachan, Always in God’s Hands: Day by Day in the Company of Jonathan Edwards, 299.

Edwards: Satisfaction Already Made

“Now some may say, why could not God, of his mercy, pardon the injury only upon repentance without other satisfaction, without doing himself any hurt? I also ask, why could not he of his mercy pardon without repentance? For the same reason he could not pardon with repentance without satisfaction. For all the repentance man is capable of is no repentance at all; or which is the same thing, it is as little as none in comparison of the greatness of the injury, for it cannot bear any proportion to it…. Wherefore, we are not forgiven now because our repentance makes any satisfaction, but because thereby we reject the sin and receive the satisfaction already made.”

-Jonathan Edwards, The Miscellanies, as recorded by Owen Strachan, Always in God’s Hands: Day by Day in the Company of Jonathan Edwards, 296.

Edwards: The Light of Christ

As the sun, by rising out of darkness and from under the earth raises the whole world with him, raises mankind out of their beds, and by his light as it were renews all things and fetches ’em up out of darkness, so Christ, rising from the grave and from a state of death, he as the first begotten from the dead, raises all his church with him; Christ the first fruits, and afterward they that are Christ’s at his coming. And as all the world is enlightened and brought out of darkness by the rising of the sun, so by Christ’s rising we are begotten again to a living hope; and all our happiness and life and light and glory and the restitution of all things is from Christ rising from the dead, and is by his resurrection.

-Jonathan Edwards, Typological Writings, as recorded by Owen Strachan, Always in God’s Hands: Day by Day in the Company of Jonathan Edwards, 286.

Edwards: Looking Upon that Soul that Is Holy

“Oh, how may angels stand, with pleased, delighted and charmed eyes, and look and look, with smiles of pleasure upon their lips, upon that soul that is holy; how may they hover over such a soul, to delight to behold such loveliness! How is it above all the heathen virtues, of a more light, bright and pure nature, more serene and calm, more peaceful and delightsome! What a sweet calmness, what a calm ecstasy, doth it bring to the soul! How doth it make the soul love itself; how doth it make the pure invisible world love it; yea, how doth God love it and delight in it; how do even the whole creation, the sun, the fields and trees love a humble holiness.”

-Jonathan Edwards, The Miscellanies, as recorded by Owen Strachan, Always in God’s Hands: Day by Day in the Company of Jonathan Edwards, 288.

Edwards: For the Sake of Christ

“When we pray for grace for the sake of Christ, we should intend thereby to desire God to remember that ’twill be to his Son’s joy and happiness; for the bestowment of God’s grace upon us was the joy that was set before him, the reward he expected, that made him cheerfully subject himself to such torments. Our happiness was a thing he really desired, and made an agreement with God about, by which he was to undertake great labors…and the more of us obtain grace, and the more grace and happiness we obtain, the more pleasure and glory doth he enjoy. And therefore ’tis for his sake we may ask of God, for our grace is his joy.”

-Jonathan Edwards, The Miscellanies, as recorded by Owen Strachan, Always in God’s Hands: Day by Day in the Company of Jonathan Edwards, 313.

Edwards: Totally Dead

“When we say that all men by nature are altogether depraved and corrupted, and without the least grain of true holiness, children of wrath, nothing else can truly be intended but that every man is so of himself, as he is of nature. Nothing else is belonging to us but sin and misery, as we are in Adam; nothing but misery belongs to us according to the first covenant, that we are all under in our first state; and when we are born, nothing else is in us according to the first constitution of things….What he has given him now is according to a new and extraordinary way; ’tis being born again.”

-Jonathan Edwards, The Miscellanies, as recorded by Owen Strachan, Always in God’s Hands: Day by Day in the Company of Jonathan Edwards, 305.

Edwards: True Greatness

“The greatness, distance and motion of this great universe, has almost an omnipotent power upon the imagination; the blood will even be chilled with the vast idea. But the greatness of vast expanse, immense distance, prodigious bulk and rapid motion, is but a little, trivial and childish greatness in comparison of the noble, refined, exalted, divine, spiritual greatnesses. Yea, these are but the shadows of greatness and are worthless, except as they conduce to true and real greatness and excellency, and manifest the power and wisdom of God.”

-Jonathan Edwards, The Miscellanies, as recorded by Owen Strachan, Always in God’s Hands: Day by Day in the Company of Jonathan Edwards, 304.